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EINFACHE PROJEKTION #5: Sylvie Fleury, Dezember 3rd-17th 2021

EINFACHE PROJEKTION #6: Michaela Müller, 5th-17th January 2022


Linsebühlstrasse 25, St.Gallen, from dusk to midnight

About

EINFACHE PROJEKTIONEN (SIMPLE PROJECTIONS) is a new format of stadtprojektionen. Unlike stadtprojektionen, which is spread out across an entire neighbourhood, EINFACHE PROJEKTIONEN focuses on the multitude of references that emanate from one specific location. The exhibited works are caused to interact with stories and realities surrounding the shop at Linsebühlstrasse 25, where EINFACHE PROJEKTIONEN will appear 6-8 times over the course of 2021.

EINFACHE PROJEKTIONEN makes do without any accompanying events: It is simply there for nocturnal passers-by.


Artists

#5 – Sylvie Fleury

Current Issues, 31 min. 56 sec., 1997
3rd-17th of December 2021

EINFACHE PROJEKTION #5 – Sylvie Fleury, Current Issues, 31 min 56 sec, 1997.

Current Issues, 31 min. 56 sec., 1997
3rd-17th of December 2021

EINFACHE PROJEKTION #5 – Sylvie Fleury, Current Issues, 31 min 56 sec, 1997.

As people walk past Linsebühlstrasse 25, the sounds of soft clattering and pop come from inside. The video Current Issues by Sylvie Fleury blends with the soundscape of the bustling busy street. Close-ups of a hand leafing through fashion magazines alternate with street shots, showing the same sequence over and over again: A sports car drives up, a man gets out, he opens the boot, takes out a roll of paper, stands beside the car, unrolls the paper, holds it up to the camera, then rolls it up again and speeds away with tyres screeching. A cut follows – and the act of leafing through magazines recommences. The handwritten placards, in black on white, show elliptical phrases like BE AMAZING, DARE TO BE DIORIFIC, CLASSICS ARE BLACK or A REVOLUTION IN ARTIFICIAL NAILS: fragmentary word groups that can also be found in the fashion magazines themselves and simultaneously provide for women’s (self-)fulfilment.

Within the art scene, which Fleury has been an indispensible part of since the 1990s, her position is a feminist one. This artist has succeeded in transferring the consumer world and its glamour to the art world, while constantly remaining subversive.


EINFACHE PROJEKTION #5 – Sylvie Fleury, Current Issues, 31 min 56 sec, 1997.

The digitised VHS from 1997 makes reference to an earlier use of this shop: In 1937, Linsebühlstrasse 25 was home to DAMEN SALON, a hairdressing salon. Thus, the scenes in Current Issues refer not only to the exterior and the busy street, but also to the interior: Everyone is familiar with reaching for a fashion magazine when visiting a hairdresser, of which there are several in Linsebühl.

#5 – Sylvie Fleury

EINFACHE PROJEKTION #5 – Sylvie Fleury, Current Issues, 31 min 56 sec, 1997.

#5 – Sylvie Fleury

EINFACHE PROJEKTION #5 – Sylvie Fleury, Current Issues, 31 min 56 sec, 1997.

#4 – Lucia Moholy

Series of 18 photographs, 1925–1928
November 8-21, 2021

Einfache Projektion #4: Lucia Moholy, semi-detached residential building
 (south-east view), 1926.

Series of 18 photographs, 1925–1928
November 8-21, 2021

Einfache Projektion #4: Lucia Moholy, Anni Albers, 1927.

Einfache Projektion #4 revolves around modernist architecture. A series of photos by Lucia Moholy (1894-1989), who used photography as a means of closely following the early years of the Bauhaus in Dessau, is projected. The School of Arts and Crafts, with its iconic ensemble of buildings, was constructed in 1925 and 1926 according to plans by architect Walter Gropius. Moholy photographed the shell of the studio building, providing a view of the steel skeleton before the curtain-wall glass facade was added to it. The series also includes the masters’ houses with their captivating interiors, in which the Bauhaus teachers and their families lived, surrounded by a pine forest. In addition, Moholy produced impressive portraits of female protagonists who had shaped the school but often remained in the shadow of the men – such as painter Lily Hildebrandt, cabinetmaker Eva Fernbach and textile artist Anni Albers. With her photographs, Lucia Moholy has shaped the visual image of the Bauhaus to this day. By projecting her photos, the curators counter St Gallen’s male-dominated modernist architecture with a confident female gaze.


Einfache Projektion #4: Lucia Moholy, Anni Albers, 1927.

Due to the embroidery crisis of the 1920s and 1930s, very few buildings were constructed in St Gallen at that time. The building that houses the shop in which Einfache Projektionen can be seen at irregular intervals throughout 2021 is St Gallen’s main representative of that era’s so-called New Objectivity style: The Linsebühl building, a complex between Linsebühlstrasse and Lämmlisbrunnenstrasse, was constructed between 1930 and 1933 by architect Moritz Hauser. It could not have broken away from art-nouveau St Gallen any more markedly: cubic forms, a white plastered facade incorporating the course of the street, a flat roof, roof terraces and corner windows – the Linsebühl building exhibits all the stylistic features of New Objectivity.

The 18 photographs by Lucia Moholy belong to the Fotostiftung Schweiz collection. © 2021, ProLitteris, Zurich

#4 – Lucia Moholy

Einfache Projektion #4: Lucia Moholy, semi-detached residential building
 (south-east view), 1926.

#4 – Lucia Moholy

Einfache Projektion #4: Lucia Moholy, Anni Albers, 1927.

#3 – Jiajia Zhang & Jiri Makovec

Untitled (Loop Linsebühl), 2021, 5min 38sec
September 1–13, 2021

Jiajia Zhang & Jiri Makovec, Untitled (Loop Linsebühl), 2021.

Jiajia Zhang and Jiri Makovec have been living in Linsebühl for several years, on the seventh floor of a residential high-rise on Lämmlisbrunnenstrasse, built at the end of the 1950s by architects Otto Glaus, Heribert Stadlin and Willi Schuchter. Here, Linsebühl adopts a metropolitan appearance. The view out of the window reveals an extensive streetscape that has repeatedly found its way into the imagery of Zhang and Makovec.
For Einfache Projektion #3 the artists merged their footage from the neighbourhood: Gathered over the span of a few years and on a recent afternoon walk, casually recorded to be assembled and re-assembled. A circular loop in the Linsebühl provided all the material: banal and dramatic, cinematic, mysterious and from the everyday. 

«Looking through windows into windows, into mirrors onto screens. Eyes meet eyes, in rooms and past lives. Frame by frame, a throw, air, snow. The change of season, the shift from day to night. Joyful dancing and the slow decay of the day. Ascending moon, ‘night’ in daylight. Portrayed by former residents, performed by princes, ghosts and future agents. Found language fictionalises place and still stays local. Inside is the new outside and any place is made up of hybrids. Screening in September through the window for the passers-by.» – Jiajia Zhang

Website Jiajia Zhang
Website Jiri Markovec

#3 – Jiajia Zhang & Jiri Makovec

Jiajia Zhang & Jiri Makovec, Untitled (Loop Linsebühl), 2021.

#2 – Manon de Boer

Presto, Perfect Sound, 6 min., 2006
April 6-19, 2021

Manon de Boer, Presto, Perfect Sound, 6 min., 2006.

Einfache Projektion #2 shows the film Presto, Perfect Sound (2006, 6 min.) by Dutch video artist Manon de Boer. For this film, violinist George van Dam played a sonata by Hungarian composer Béla Bartok six times in a row. De Boer filmed the violinist and recorded the sound. She then asked him to take the sound sequences that he thought were the best from the six recordings and to assemble the piece from them, as one perfect recording. Afterwards, De Boer matched the visual layer to the sound. While the soundtrack now runs continuously, the visual layer is interspersed with cuts that are as hard as they are unexpected. In Presto, Perfect Sound, Manon de Boer breaks away from the traditional dominance of image over sound in film. At the same time, by focusing on the violinist’s face without changing the framing during the course of the film, she gives his emotions a lot of space while he plays.  

Presto, Perfect Sound makes direct reference to the shop at Linsebühlstrasse 25 and to what it is used for: Christopher Lüthi has been running a violin-making studio here on Tuesdays for over 25 years. In Linsebühl, Manon de Boer’s film can be perceived in two ways: purely visually from across the street, or acoustically, by pressing an ear on the outside of the shop window so the sound from inside reaches it. The situation that the film thus creates is almost like the Tuesdays when the violin maker is present: His customers come to pick up the instruments and often spend a few moments producing sounds with them – visible through the shop window, but not always audible.  

With its calm and subtle visual language, Presto, Perfect Sound provides a counterpoint to the urban, busy and noisy street Linsebühlstrasse.  

Manon de Boer lives and works in Brussels. In her films, she works with experimental musicians, dancers or actors and thematises levels of perception, along with their fractures and interconnections.

With many thanks to Manon de Boer (Auguste Orts), Christopher Lüthi, Bastian Lehner and the city and tha canton of St. Gallen.

#2 – Manon de Boer

Manon de Boer, Presto, Perfect Sound, 6 min., 2006.

#1 – Hannes Schüpbach

VERSO (2008): February 13-20, 2021

CONTOUR (2011): February 21-27, 2021

CONTOUR (2011): February 21-27, 2021

Hannes Schüpbach, VERSO, 13 min 08 sec, 2008.

VERSO (2008): February 13-20, 2021

Hannes Schüpbach, CONTOUR, 16 min 19 sec, 2011.

Filmmaker Hannes Schüpbach starts it off with two films: VERSO (2008) and CONTOUR (2011). The former is a cinematic approach to his father. A glance into the shop at Linsebühlstrasse 25 shows the father – he reads, drinks coffee or dozes, he looks at the landscape and at things, the trees dance in the wind and he goes wandering. In CONTOUR, individual shots from SPIN (2001) and VERSO are now interwoven. We are given brief insights into the lifeworlds of both mother and father, repeatedly interrupted with frames of black, in rapid succession. The individual images slide out of control. In CONTOUR, the altered montage creates a more abstract visual language: Colours and forms are layered, contours become blurred.

«[...] Schüpbach’s films operate on a level that can be compared to the dream or trance.» – Maya Naef, in: Film as Corporeal Exposition, 2012.

In the vicinity of the VERSO and CONTOUR projections, a very wide variety of residential and living situations resonate in the background: Glimpses into flats in the Linsebühl building, built between 1930 and 1933, are fleeting in nature – much like the film’s short scenes. Due to Covid-19, a large portion of our lives currently takes place in private. Schüpbach’s two films bring it back into the public space.

Hannes Schüpbach was already represented in the second edition of stadtprojektionen, which took place in the Linsebühl neighbourhood in 2017: SPIN (2001), a portrait of his mother, was shown in a closed perimeter block development. VERSO and CONTOUR now conclude Hannes Schüpbach’s trilogy in Linsebühl.


Hannes Schüpbach, CONTOUR, 16 min 19 sec, 2011.

#1 – Hannes Schüpbach

Hannes Schüpbach, VERSO, 13 min 08 sec, 2008.

#1 – Hannes Schüpbach

Hannes Schüpbach, CONTOUR, 16 min 19 sec, 2011.

Press

Saiten, 16. Februar 2021, Lichtspiele durchs Schaufenster

Support

Thank you! EINFACHE PROJEKTIONEN is generously supported by: